Using the Support Debugging Tool to create user accessible SQL Scripts – Part 3


David Meego - Click for blog homepageThis is the third and final article in the series, make sure you look at the previous articles before this one.

The previous articles can be found at:

Today’s article adds the final step by adding a method for a user to execute the code we have written so far without requiring access to any Support Debugging Tool windows.

The Runtime Execute window and SQL Execute windows are Advanced Mode features which makes them only available to users with access to the Administrator features via the security roles AND the system password (if used) AND SQL dbo or SysAdmin privileges. You would not want this sort of access to be given to the average user, so you can use the method in this article to provide access to the scripts we have written from an existing window.

Using the Automatic Debugger Mode we can create a non-logging trigger to call our scripts when an event occurs in the system. The event used can be any of the system events supported by Dexterity, such as opening or closing a window, moving focus in to or out of a field (with or without changing to the field), or clicking on a button. You can also create your own items on the Additional menu to trigger off.

For our example, we are going to use two methods; an additional menu and re-purposing the window print button on the Customer Maintenance window.

Part 3: Exposing the script to any user

The final step is to use Automatic Debugger Mode Setup to call our previously created Runtime Execute script.

  1. Open the Support Debugging Tool main window (Microsoft Dynamics GP >> Tools >> Support Debugging Tool or Ctrl-D).
  2. Open the Support Debugging Tool Setup window (Options >> Setup Automatic Debugger Mode).
  3. Enter the Trigger ID, Trigger Description as desired for menu based trigger.
  4. Check the Start Trigger Automatically on Login, Do not activate Logging Mode and Minimize Debugger Log Entries checkboxes.
  5. Select the Trigger Type: Add Form Menu, Trigger Event: Form Level, and Trigger Attach: After Menu Selected.
  6. On the Resource tab, select Product Name: Microsoft Dynamics GP, Form Name: RM_Customer_Maintenance, Menu Entry: Check and Update Hold, Accelerator Key: U.
    Trigger1
  7. On the Script tab, set Context: Microsoft Dynamics GP and the script to:
    out boolean OUT_Condition;
    local text MBS_Text_Field;
    local integer MBS_Dictionary;
    local integer MBS_Status;
    
    OUT_Condition = false;
    
    if isopen(form RM_Customer_Maintenance) then
    	OUT_Condition = true;
    
    	call with name "MBS_Script_Load_Dex" in dictionary 5261,
    		"DEMO1", MBS_Text_Field, MBS_Dictionary;
    
    	call with name "MBS_Runtime_Execute" in dictionary 5261,
    		MBS_Text_Field, MBS_Dictionary, MBS_Status;
    	if MBS_Status <> OKAY then
    		warning MBS_Text_Field;
    	end if;
    
    end if;
    

    Trigger2

  8. You can use the Helper Button at the bottom of the window to insert Helper Functions at the current cursor location for loading and executing the Dexterity Runtime Execute script. Variables needed will be automatically added to the top of the script.
  9. No changes needed on the Actions and Options tabs
  10. Click Save.
  11. Enter the Trigger ID, Trigger Description as desired for button based trigger.
  12. Check the Start Trigger Automatically on Login, Do not activate Logging Mode and Minimize Debugger Log Entries checkboxes.
  13. Select the Trigger Type: Focus Event, Trigger Event: Field Change, and Trigger Attach: Before Original.
  14. On the Resource tab, select Product Name: Microsoft Dynamics GP, Form Name: RM_Customer_Maintenance, Window: RM_Customer_Maintenance, Field Name: WindowPrint.
    Trigger3
  15. On the Script tab, set Context: Microsoft Dynamics GP and the script to:
    in string IN_OldValue;
    in string IN_NewValue;
    out boolean OUT_Condition;
    
    local text MBS_Text_Field;
    local integer MBS_Dictionary;
    local integer MBS_Status;
    
    OUT_Condition = false;
    
    if isopen(form RM_Customer_Maintenance) then
    	OUT_Condition = true;
    
    	call with name "MBS_Script_Load_Dex" in dictionary 5261,
    		"DEMO1", MBS_Text_Field, MBS_Dictionary;
    
    	call with name "MBS_Runtime_Execute" in dictionary 5261,
    		MBS_Text_Field, MBS_Dictionary, MBS_Status;
    	if MBS_Status <> OKAY then
    		warning MBS_Text_Field;
    	end if;
    
    end if;
    

    Trigger4

  16. You can use the Helper Button at the bottom of the window to insert Helper Functions at the current cursor location for loading and executing the Dexterity Runtime Execute script. Variables needed will be automatically added to the top of the script.
  17. On the Actions tab, check the Issue Reject Script checkbox to prevent the original button script from running after our trigger code finishes.
  18. No changes needed on Options tab.
  19. Click Save.

To automatically enable the triggers, just log in again to the company. To manually enable the triggers, from the Support Debugging Tool main window, select Turn On Automatic Debugger Mode >> Non Logging Automatic Start Only. To disable the triggers, from the Support Debugging Too main window, select Options >> Automatic Debugger Mode Status and then click Unregister >> Non Logging Triggers Only. To disable all triggers, use Unregister >> All Triggers, this is required if you want to open the Setup Automatic Debugger Mode window again.

Notes

  • Use the Automatic Debugger Mode Status window (Options >> Automatic Debugger Mode Status) to confirm that the triggers are registered and active.
  • Note that the target window must be closed and re-opened after the triggers are enabled before they will be active.
  • If re-purposing an existing button, you can use an ask() dialog to ask if you want the original purpose or the new purpose to execute. For the original purpose, exit the script with the variable OUT_Condition equal to false. For the new purpose, perform the desired actions and exit the script with the variable OUT_Condition equal to true and the action Issue Reject Script ticked.
  • If you are having problems getting the code to work, uncheck the Minimize Debugger Log Entries checkbox to get more information recorded in the Debugger_<User>_<Company>.log file.
  • It is possible to load and execute the SQL Execute scripts directly using the Dexterity trigger code and bypass Step 2 of this series using Runtime Execute, however this makes it harder to test the code as you will need to keep registering and unregistering the trigger.

Below is the Debugger Settings files with all the code for the examples in this series.

Please write feedback and comments below to let me know how you think you could use these methods in your systems.

Hope you found this series useful.

David

This article was originally posted on http://www.winthropdc.com/blog.

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